Calif. Appeals Court overturns lower court’s decision on teacher tenure rules

Calif. Appeals Court overturns lower court’s decision on teacher tenure rules

A California appeals court on Thursday overturned a lower court's decision that the state's job protections for teachers deprive minority and poor students of quality education and violate their civil rights.

Around a couple of years ago, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge struck down the state's five statutes linked with the awarding of permanent tenures to teachers, as well as rules governing use of seniority to determine job cuts during budget crises.

But, the state's appeals court yesterday overturned that decision, and ruled that teacher tenure rules don't deprive minority and poor students of a quality education or breach their civil rights.

Overturning the lower court's decision, a bench of three appeals judges the statutes couldn't be blamed even if inefficient teachers are in place because it was school administration that who determined where teachers are assigned to teach.

Welcoming the ruling, the California Teachers Association said, "I consider this a victory for teachers and a victory for students. What these statutes have done is, one, they bring stability to the system, and for many students they bring stability to their schools and to the teachers in their schools."

The California appeals court's decision came just a day after a group of parents filed a lawsuit challenging Minnesota's controversial job protections for teachers. A similar court case is pending in New York.